Use Port Scanner on Mac OS Network Utility

Use  Port Scanner on Mac OS Network Utility

This guide is about the How to Use the Port Scanner in Mac OS X Network Utility. I will try my best so that you understand this guide very well. I hope you all like this guide How to Use the Port Scanner in Mac OS X Network Utility.

Mac OS X comes with the included port scanner tool, just one of many features always associated with a useful Network Utility. This means you don’t have to bother on the command line or install more advanced tools like nmap to quickly search for open ports on a particular IP or domain, instead you can do everything through a friendly graphical user interface. Despite being a fairly advanced utility, it is really easy to use.

Quick Tip: Remember that newer versions of Mac OS X have moved Network Utility to be buried in a system folder, which doesn’t mean it can’t be used, it just means you have to either create an alias, start it from Spotlight, or check it in System Information . For this walkthrough, we use Spotlight to launch the Web Utility and start the scan, as it is the easiest and fastest route, although if you plan to use the tool frequently, you will probably want to do the alias yourself. OK, go directly to the scan ports.

Scan ports for an IP or domain from Mac OS X.

You can select any local or remote IP to scan if you are alone on the network (or even the air pit) and still want to try this for yourself, use the IP address of the loop as “127.0.0.1”:

  1. To call Spotlight, press Command + SPACEBAR and type “Network Utility” followed by the back key to launch the Network Utility
  2. Select the “Port Scan” tab
  3. Enter the IP address or domain you want to search for open ports and select “scan”
  4. Optional, but not necessarily recommended, you can set the port range to scan if you only want to search for certain active services

Port scanner tool for Mac OS X.

127.0.0.1 or “localhost” will only check for open ports on the local Mac if you are new to port scanning, which may be the recommended way to proceed because most reasonably well-secured remote domains reject or do not respond to incoming requests.

Let the Port Scan tool run and you will quickly see all open TCP ports and their traditionally recognized use. For example, you might see something like this if you scan localhost (127.0.0.1):

Port scanning has started … Port scan host: 127.0.0.1Open TCP port: 22 sshOpen TCP port: 80 httpOpen TCP port: 88 kerberosOpen TCP port: 445 microsoft-dsOpen TCP port: 548 afpovertcpOpen TCP port: 631 ippOpen TCP port: 3689 daap

The visible ports vary from machine to machine depending on the services and servers available, but if you scan Macs and PCs, you’ll usually find network servers, SMB Windows Sharing Port 445, AFP Apple File Sharing on Port 548, maybe active SSH Server 22 , UDP servers and possibly a wide range of others. The port scan goes pretty high when it scans, so just let it run if you want to see everything.

If you find that nothing comes up, but you know that the IP is active in open services, either the machine is not sending, the recipient’s machine is rejecting all requests, or a strong firewall may be configured. This makes Network Utility’s port scanner a great way to quickly check for security and test for potential vulnerabilities or active services on neighboring Macs, iOS devices, Windows, Linux machines, and any other computers that are scanned.

The web utility is apparently limited to the Mac, and while there are no built-in tools on the iOS side of things, it’s possible to scan ports from iPhone and iPad with fing using the free tool, a very handy addition to the advanced iOS toolkit.

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FAQ: How to Use the Port Scanner in Mac OS X Network Utility

Guide about How to Use the Port Scanner in Mac OS X Network Utility

In this guide, I told you about the How to Use the Port Scanner in Mac OS X Network Utility.

How this Guide helping you?

In this guide, I discuss about the How to Use the Port Scanner in Mac OS X Network Utility, which is very helpful.

What are the supported devices for this guide?

Apple Devices only.

What are the supported Operating system?

mac OS or iOS


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