Display Resolution Explained: What is FHD, QHD, UHD, 4K, 5K, 8K?

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These phrases are used a lot these days when it comes to anything with a digital screen. These random phrases and numbers can be found on everything from 6-inch cell phones to 55-inch (or larger) TV screens. But what exactly do they mean? What are the differences between 2K and 4K? What exactly is the difference between QHD and QHD? In simple terms, resolution refers to the number of pixels on a monitor or screen. A single pixel, also called a discrete pixel, is a tiny dot on the screen.

The entire image on your device screen is often made up of millions of tiny dots. A million pixels are packed into even a modest 5-inch phone with a 720p screen. As a general rule, the higher the resolution the better, but this does not guarantee that a higher resolution screen will look better than a lower resolution screen. Resolution is just one of many elements that come together to deliver an impressive presentation. By itself it cannot be the crucial element between a good presentation and a bad one.

HD/720p and Full HD/1080p

Never before has a technical specification been so overused and abused as High Definition or HD. The term has become synonymous with anything that elevates detail or quality beyond all that has gone before. However, when we talk about screen resolutions, the term HD is based on the native resolutions of HDTVs.

When HD TV first came out, there were a handful of broadcast resolutions and display resolutions. The simplest was 1280 pixels wide and 720 pixels tall, cropped to 720p. The lowercase p refers to “progressive scan” as opposed to saying 1080i, which is “interlaced,” but we won’t get bogged down with that here.

When we talk about HD these days, we’re talking about “Full HD,” a resolution that measures 1920 x 1080 pixels, often referred to as 1080p. This screen resolution is common on smart TVs and many modern smartphones, PCs, laptops, and monitors. Both HD resolutions here use a 16:9 aspect ratio (that is, 16 pixels horizontally for every 9 vertically), which can be described as widescreen. However, on a phone, 1280 x 720 becomes 720 x 1280 when held normally.

QHD/WQHD/1440p

In the smartphone revolution of the past five years, manufacturers have been desperate to put higher-resolution screens on phones, even when they’re not needed. It’s often argued that resolutions higher than Full HD are wasted on comparatively small panels, as even people with perfect eyesight struggle to tell the difference. Despite this, phone manufacturers have been doing it anyway, probably for marketing purposes. As a result, Quad High Definition (QHD) displays have become a popular choice in modern mobile phones.

QHD has four times the resolution of standard 720p HD, which means you can fit the same number of pixels as four HD screens on the same size QHD screen, which is 2560 x 1440 pixels, or 1440p. As with all resolutions derived from HD, this has a wide aspect ratio of 16:9, so QHD can also be referred to as WQHD (Wide Quad High Definition), it’s the same thing, but some manufacturers put a W in front of QHD to show that it has the wide aspect ratio.

qHD

qHD should not be confused with QHD. Despite the very similar name, qHD stands for Quarter High Definition and has a screen resolution of 960 x 540 pixels, a quarter of 1080p Full HD.

This is used much less frequently these days. It was often found in high-end smartphones and handheld consoles, such as the PlayStation Vita, and when used today it’s usually found on much smaller device screens for relatively high pixel density where anything larger would be wasteful. .

4K and UHD/UHD-1

4K and Ultra High Definition (UHD) resolutions can cause confusion, as the two terms are often used interchangeably, although they are not actually the same thing. So we have to explain that a bit as well. True 4K displays are used in professional production and digital cinemas and feature 4096 x 2160 pixels.

UHD is different in that it is a consumer display and broadcast standard with a resolution four times higher than 1080p Full HD resolution: 3840 x 2160 pixels. The difference comes from the slightly different aspect ratios between digital cinema and home screens. UHD is another 16:9 aspect ratio standard, which means the displays are compatible with Full HD content.

5K and beyond

5K is still kind of niche as not many manufacturers produce 5K panels. Suffice it to say that they exist; from Apple’s 5K iMac to Iiyama’s ProLite XB2779QQS, with a ridiculous 5120×2880 resolution. That’s double the resolution of a QHD panel, which still looks sharp to the naked eye. 5K monitors are in a league of their own. Of course, with all those pixels, you’ll need a variety of graphics cards to get consistent output above 60Hz.

5K is still kind of niche as not many manufacturers produce 5K panels. Suffice it to say that they exist; from Apple’s 5K iMac to Iiyama’s ProLite XB2779QQS, with a ridiculous 5120×2880 resolution. That’s double the resolution of a QHD panel, which still looks sharp to the naked eye. 5K monitors are in a league of their own. Of course, with all those pixels, you’ll need a variety of graphics cards to get consistent output above 60Hz.

8K and 8K UHD

Any program or computer-based image with a pixel width or more of approximately 8000 pixels has an 8K target. The 8K lens produces light tones and subtleties. It is expressed that at this target level, pixels cannot be seen by the natural eye and displayed images look extremely clear as there are no dots visible to the eyes. As for 8K UHD screens, they have a 16:9 aspect ratio and around 7680×4320 pixels.

Final words: Display Resolution Explained: What is FHD, QHD, UHD, 4K, 5K, 8K?

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Editorial Staff
Editorial Staffhttps://www.bollyinside.com
The Bollyinside editorial staff is made up of tech experts with more than 10 years of experience Led by Sumit Chauhan. We started in 2014 and now Bollyinside is a leading tech resource, offering everything from product reviews and tech guides to marketing tips. Think of us as your go-to tech encyclopedia!

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