Mickey Mantle Rookie Card Sells For $ 5.2 Million, Setting Record For Largest Card Transaction

Mickey Mantle Rookie Card Sells For $ 5.2 Million, Setting Record For Largest Card Transaction

A new all-time record was set in the burgeoning sports card market, with an extremely rare 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle rookie card selling Thursday for a record $ 5.2 million. The Mantle Sale is just the latest example of the upward rise of the flourishing industry. Last month, a 1979 O-Pee-Chee was bought for $ 1.29 million at auction, setting the all-time record for a hockey card sale. In July, a 2003-04 Upper Deck LeBron James rookie card sold, the most money ever paid for a basketball card. 1952 was the first year that Topps entered the sports card market, which made the set, and the Mantle card in particular, extremely popular. Gough, who bought the in 2017, said in an exclusive interview that there are three Mantle rated PSA-10s, but Gough has been told that each of these cards is in “strong hands,” meaning the owners have no interest in selling. (An owner was reportedly offered $ 20 million for one of the 10 but declined.) Rarely does a 1952 Mantle caliber hit the market, so when the opportunity presented itself, Gough has said he “had to grab it,” adding, “I think I got a great deal on this card.” Gough believes the card was “massively undervalued” compared to other iconic cards on the market, and that the $ 5.2 million price tag was “a steal.” “I’ve always wanted this card,” Gough told Fobes. “I was looking for this ‘Holy Grail’, the Mona Lisa of sports cards, the [1952 Mantle PSA-graded] 9. I finally got the 9. ”PWCC, a site which includes analytical tools, includes market indices representing the investment performance of professional-grade collectible cards. Their “” tracks the top 500 prime trading card assets produced before 2000, against the S&P 500. Dating back to 2008, their analysis, the PWCC 500 nearly doubled the return on investment of the S&P 500. Yet Jesse Craig, Director of Business Development at PWCC, said he remains very optimistic about the market going forward due to “the amount of infrastructure being built to help support collectible cards and legitimize them. as a class of tangible assets. 2%. The sports card market as a whole is only 1 / 10th the size of the coins market and about 1 / 50th the size of the art market, according to Craig, although sports cards are “much more. widespread ”that exhibits or art. Craig explains that he was convinced that “once the masses get their hands on trading cards as a tangible asset class, they will skyrocket.” (Forbes)

Highlights

  • According to Forbes “Mickey Mantle’s rookie card sells for $ 5.2 million, setting a record for largest card transaction.”
  • The Mantle Sale is just the latest example of the upward rise of the flourishing industry. Last month, a 1979 O-Pee-Chee was bought for $ 1.29 million at auction, setting the all-time record for a hockey card sale. In July, a 2003-04 Upper Deck LeBron James rookie card sold, the most money ever paid for a basketball card. 1952 was the first year that Topps entered the sports card market, which made the set, and the Mantle card in particular, extremely popular. Gough, who bought the in 2017, said in an exclusive interview that there are three Mantle rated PSA-10s, but Gough has been told that each of these cards is in “strong hands,” meaning the owners have no interest in selling. (An owner was reportedly offered $ 20 million for one of the 10 but declined.) Rarely does a 1952 Mantle caliber hit the market, so when the opportunity presented itself, Gough has said he “had to grab it,” adding, “I think I got a great deal on this card.” Gough believes the card was “massively undervalued” compared to other iconic cards on the market, and that the $ 5.2 million price tag was “a steal.”

Read the full story

Check all news and articles from the Money news and blog.

Bollyinside - US Local News & Breaking News Stories
Compare items
  • Total (0)
Compare
0