Science News Roundup: Japan eyes satellite research for disputed isles in East China Sea; Australian intelligence agencies prepare for small satellite deployment and more

In this news, we discuss the Science News Roundup: Japan eyes satellite research for disputed isles in East China Sea; Australian intelligence agencies prepare for small satellite deployment and more.

Here is a summary of current scientific information.

Japan plans satellite search of disputed East China Sea islands

Japan plans to use satellite imagery to further research into the natural environment of the East China Sea islets claimed by China, the senior government spokesperson said, though the plans will not involve anyone from ‘set foot there. Japan’s relations with China have long been plagued by a territorial dispute over the uninhabited islands controlled by Tokyo, known as Senkaku in Japan, but called Diaoyu in China.

Eight countries sign US-led Artemis moon accords

Eight countries have signed an international pact for lunar exploration called the Artemis Accords, NASA said on Tuesday as the US space agency attempts to set standards for building long-term colonies on the lunar surface. The agreements, named after NASA’s Artemis lunar program, aim to build on existing international space law by establishing “safe zones” that would surround future moon bases to avoid conflict between states operating there. and by allowing private companies to own the lunar resources they exploit.

COVID-19 Increases Risks For Cancer Patients; cold antibodies did not help against coronavirus

The following is a summary of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus. COVID-19 increases the risks for cancer patients.

Australian intelligence agencies prepare for deployment of small satellites

Australian intelligence agencies plan to experiment with small satellite technology, which typically includes tracking of marine planes and ships as well as weather forecasting, as part of a tie-up with space data and analysis company Spire Global, based in San Francisco. The Djara satellite, developed for the Australian Office of National Intelligence, is expected to be deployed from the International Space Station early next month, Spire said in a statement to Reuters.

Remains of the day: the dinosaur skeleton brings in three million euros

The nearly complete skeleton of a carnivorous dinosaur that roamed the earth around 150 million years ago was sold on Tuesday at a Paris auction house for 3 million euros ($ 3.52 million). The Allosaurus dinosaur skeleton, unearthed three years ago in the US state of Wyoming, has gone to an unnamed foreign buyer for well over the starting price of $ 1 million.

Japanese supercomputer shows humidity affects the spread of coronavirus aerosols

A Japanese supercomputer has shown that humidity can have a strong effect on the dispersion of viral particles, indicating increased risks of coronavirus contagion in dry indoor conditions during the winter months. The finding suggests that using humidifiers may help limit infections during times when window ventilation isn’t possible, according to a study released Tuesday by research giant Riken and Kobe University.

One American, two Russians fly to the International Space Station

A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying an American astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts successfully reached the International Space Station after taking off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, live footage from Russian space agency Roscosmos showed. The Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, a microbiologist who in 2016 became the first person to sequence DNA in space, and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov reached the space station about three hours after takeoff, bringing orbit. the size of the lab crew to five.

News Highlights:

  • Eight countries sign US-led Artemis moon accords Eight countries have signed an international pact for lunar exploration called the Artemis accords, NASA said on Tuesday as the US space agency tries to set standards for building long-term colonies on the lunar surface.
  • Scientific News Recap: Japan Considering Satellite Research For Disputed East China Sea Islands; Australian intelligence agencies prepare for deployment of small satellites and more
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