What isCD-DA

CD-DA, or Compact Disc Digital Audio, is the standard used for reading audio tracks on a CD. It was developed by Philips and Sony as a part of the Red Book, first published in 1980. CD-DA allows up to 74 minutes of audio playback, with a digital transfer rate of 150 kbps. It’s the same format that is used in regular CD players.

While CDs have been replaced by other digital storage and distribution formats in recent years, they still remain an important distribution method for the music industry. In fact, revenue from digital music services has finally reached the level of revenue from sales of physical formats like CDs, according to the RIAA’s 2020 Semiannual Report.

CD-DA audio data is made up of two-channel signed 16-bit linear PCM with a sampling frequency of 44,100 Hz. The audio data stream on a CD is continuous, but it consists of three parts, with the playable audio track being the main part.

Frequently Asked Questions

How long can a CD-DA play?

A CD-DA can play up to 74 minutes of audio.

What is the difference between CD-DA and CDDA?

There is no difference between CD-DA and CDDA – they both refer to Compact Disc Digital Audio.

What is the Red Book?

The Red Book is a standard developed by Philips and Sony that contains all the specifications and guidelines for the CD format.

Final Thoughts

CD-DA or CDDA is the standard that defines how a CD drive reads audio tracks on a CD. While CDs are no longer the primary method of listening to music, they remain an important distribution method for the music industry. Compact Disc Digital Audio has come a long way since its inception and continues to impact the audio industry today.

- Advertisement -
Latest Definition's

ϟ Advertisement

More Definitions'