What isE-band

E-band, also known as Extremely High Frequency (EHF) band, refers to the frequency range from 60 GHz to 90 GHz, with wavelengths ranging from 3.33 mm to 5 mm. The short wavelengths provide highly directional signals, making it an ideal band for RF/microwave backhaul links.

Why is E-band used for backhaul links?

E-band is often used for backhaul links as it has high capacity and low interference levels. International Telecommunication Union has allocated a large bandwidth from 60 GHz to 86 GHz for ultra-high capacity backhaul applications, Wi-Gig, IoT needs and more.

What are the disadvantages of E-band frequency band?

One of the main disadvantages of E-band is that the atmospheric gases such as oxygen and CO2 absorb signals at these frequencies, resulting in significant attenuation. This band is not suitable for long-distance transmissions but can cover about 3 km range. Exceptionally high power levels are necessary for longer distance transmissions up to 10 km.

What are the applications of E-band?

E-band has many licensed or lightly licensed applications, including high-density wireless services, amateur radio satellites, and ultra-high-capacity backhaul applications. The FCC has made a spectrum available in the United States from 71 to 76 GHz and 81 to 86 GHz for licensed applications.

In conclusion, E-band is a high-capacity frequency band with short wavelengths and directional signals, suitable for backhaul links, IoT, and many other applications. Even though it has some disadvantages, it is still a valuable resource for many industrial and commercial applications.

FAQs

What is the frequency range of E-band?

E-band refers to the frequency range from 60 GHz to 90 GHz, with wavelengths ranging from 3.33 mm to 5 mm.

What are the main disadvantages of E-band frequency?

The atmospheric gases such as oxygen and CO2 absorb signals at these frequencies, resulting in significant attenuation, which makes this band unsuitable for long-distance transmissions.

What are the applications of E-band?

E-band has many licensed or lightly licensed applications, including ultra-high-capacity backhaul applications, high-density wireless services, and amateur radio satellites.

Final thoughts

E-band is a valuable resource for many industrial and commercial applications. Even though its use is limited by atmospheric attenuation, the short wavelengths provide highly directional signals, making it perfect for backhaul links and high-capacity wireless services.

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