What isExtended Parallel Port (EPP)

The Extended Parallel Port (EPP) is a standard input/output (I/O) interface that connects peripheral devices like printers or scanners to a PC. Developed in 1991, the EPP is a faster and more efficient port that allows for the transfer of larger amounts of data (up to 2 megabytes per second).

What is the difference between EPP and other parallel ports?

The EPP differs from other parallel ports in that it was specifically designed for non-printer devices that require high data transfer rates. It is about 10 times faster than the older connection modes and has a typical transfer rate between 500KB/S to 2MB/S.

What are the advantages of using EPP?

  • Faster transfer of larger amounts of data
  • Allows channel direction switching
  • Suitable for portable hard drives, data acquisition, and network adapters
  • Higher performance with backward compatibility to the SPP

How does EPP differ from ECP?

EPP differs from ECP in that the EPP port generates and controls all transmissions to and from the peripheral device, while ECP depends on the device for transmission.

Conclusion

The Extended Parallel Port remains widely used in modern times, even as new interface standards emerge. With its faster transfer rates and greater efficiency, the EPP continues to be a reliable and efficient option for connecting peripheral devices to a PC.

FAQ

1. What is the data transfer rate of EPP?

The EPP has a typical transfer rate between 500KB/S to 2MB/S.

2. What is the main advantage of using EPP?

The main advantage of using EPP is its faster transfer of larger amounts of data.

3. Can EPP be used for non-printer devices?

Yes, EPP was specifically designed for non-printer devices that require high data transfer rates.

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