What isinterpretive language

Interpretive language refers to a type of programming language that requires an interpreter to run on a computer, instead of being compiled into a native executable.

In simpler terms, an interpreted language is one in which instructions are executed directly by the implementation without being translated into machine code. This process results in slower program execution compared to a compiled language.

Key Features of Interpretive Language

  • Needs an interpreter to run on the target computer
  • Executes instructions without being translated into machine code
  • Programs cannot be compiled, only run
  • Runs slower than compiled programs

Despite the slower execution, interpretive languages have some advantages. For example, it allows for interactive debugging, which can be very helpful for discovering and fixing errors in the code.

FAQs

Which programming languages are interpretive?

Some of the most popular interpretive programming languages include Python, Ruby, JavaScript, and PHP.

What is the difference between an interpreted and compiled language?

Interpreted languages are executed without being translated into machine code, while compiled languages are translated into machine code before being executed.

Can an interpreted program be compiled?

No, a program written in an interpreter cannot be compiled. Instead, it is run directly by the interpreter.

Conclusion

In conclusion, an interpretive language is a type of programming language that requires an interpreter to run directly on a computer. While it comes with some trade-offs, interpretive languages have their advantages and are valuable tools in programming.

- Advertisement -
Latest Definition's

ϟ Advertisement

More Definitions'