What isnon-routable protocol

Non-routable protocols are communication protocols used in computer networking that only provide a device address instead of a network address. They are unable to transfer data between different networks and are only suitable for communicating within a local network environment.

Examples of Non-Routable Protocols

Some common examples of non-routable protocols include NetBIOS and DEC’s LAT protocols. Since these communication protocols lack an addressing method for transferring data between networks, they cannot be used for long-distance communication.

Importance in Networking

While non-routable protocols may have limited capabilities, they play a key role in the efficiency and security of local network communications. By limiting the scope of communication to just the local network, non-routable protocols make it more difficult for external threats to access network resources.

FAQs About Non-Routable Protocols

Can non-routable protocols be used for internet communication?

No, non-routable protocols are limited to communication within a local network and cannot be used for communication over the internet.

Why are non-routable protocols important for network security?

By limiting communication to just the local network, non-routable protocols make it more difficult for external threats to access network resources, providing an additional layer of security.

Conclusion

Non-routable protocols are an essential aspect of computer networking, providing local network communication capabilities while enhancing security measures. Although they are limited in their scope and capabilities, they play an integral role in network efficiency and security.

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