What isoperating system-level virtualization

Operating system-level virtualization, commonly known as containers or virtual environments, is a technique used in server management to divide a single server into multiple isolated containers or virtual environments also known as VEs. The purpose of the technique is to enhance security and system efficiency by preventing different programs from interfering with each other.

What sets OS virtualization apart from the conventional virtual machine method is that it shares one operating system, similar to a typical user’s computer. Therefore, it’s sometimes referred to as virtual private server (VPS). OS virtualization was first implemented in various Unix operating systems in the 1980s and then into the Linux community in the mid-2000s. Microsoft also introduced containers into Windows Server 2016. Docker is the most commonly used tool to configure and manage containers.

FAQs

What is the benefit of using operating system-level virtualization?

The primary benefit of using operating system-level virtualization is improved security and system efficiency by isolating different programs in containers.

What is the most popular tool for configuring and managing containers?

Docker is the most popular tool used for configuring and managing containers.

Final Thoughts

In summary, operating system-level virtualization is a technique used in server management to improve security and system efficiency by creating isolated containers or VEs. Unlike the conventional virtual machine method, OS virtualization shares one operating system, making it commonly known as a virtual private server (VPS). Docker is the most widely used tool for configuring and managing containers.

- Advertisement -
Latest Definition's

ϟ Advertisement

More Definitions'