What isPacket Exchange Protocol

NetWare is an operating system that uses Packet Exchange Protocol (PEP) internally to transmit Netware NCP commands. PEP uses the IPX protocol to establish communication between NetWare servers and clients. Meanwhile, SPX and IPX protocols are used by application programs.

PEP was developed by Xerox Corporation and became a popular option for local area networks (LANs). The PEP works using a connection-oriented protocol that helps in packet transmission and reduces network errors.

PEP uses a handshake protocol that ensures the delivery of packets without any errors. When the connection is established, the communicating devices set up a connection number that is used to identify the current connection. This procedure helps in managing multiple connections between two devices.

Overall, understanding the PEP is essential when troubleshooting NetWare-related issues on a network. By knowing how PEP works, network administrators can troubleshoot and optimize network performance to ensure that the network runs smoothly.

FAQ

What is Packet Exchange Protocol used for?

Packet Exchange Protocol (PEP) is used internally by NetWare to transmit NetWare Core Protocols (NCP) commands.

What is the difference between PEP and IPX?

PEP is a protocol used internally by NetWare while IPX is used for communication between different nodes in the network.

How does PEP ensure packet delivery?

PEP uses a handshake protocol and connection numbers to ensure the delivery of packets without errors.

Conclusion

PEP is a crucial protocol for NetWare servers and clients communication. It uses a connection-oriented approach, handshake protocol, and connection numbers to prevent errors during packet exchange. With this knowledge about PEP, network administrators can troubleshoot and optimize network performance to ensure that the network runs smoothly.

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