What isperpendicular recording

Perpendicular recording is an advanced magnetic disk recording technique where magnetic bits are stored vertically rather than horizontally, allowing them to occupy less space and increase storage density. This technology was first introduced by Toshiba and Seagate in the mid-2000s, and today, it is widely used in most hard disk drives.

Perpendicular recording has significantly boosted areal density, and now manufacturers can deliver storage drives with a capacity of terabytes, which was not possible with the traditional recording technique. By 2009, the storage density had surpassed 400 gigabits per square inch, thanks to other manufacturers adopting the technology.

Another breakthrough in the field is the heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which combines perpendicular recording with a laser to heat the medium. This technology has pushed areal density further to more than a trillion bits per square inch.

FAQs

What is perpendicular recording?

Perpendicular recording is a modern magnetic disk recording technique where magnetic bits are stored vertically rather than horizontally, allowing them to occupy less space and increase storage density.

Who introduced perpendicular recording technology?

Perpendicular recording was first introduced by Toshiba and Seagate in the mid-2000s.

What is heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR)?

Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is a technology that combines perpendicular recording with a laser to heat the medium, pushing the storage density to more than a trillion bits per square inch.

In summary, perpendicular recording is a modern magnetic disk recording technique that allows magnetic bits to be stored vertically, which has increased storage density and capacity in most hard disk drives. Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is another breakthrough that uses a laser to heat the medium, boosting storage density to more than a trillion bits per square inch.

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