What isRS/6000 SP

IBM RS/6000 SP is a series of massively parallel (MPP) computer systems that are built on IBM’s RS/6000 models and use POWER and PPC CPUs. This scalable system ranges from two to 512 processors and was first introduced in 1993. IBM’s high-speed processor interconnect, POWERparallel architecture, is used by IBM SP systems, which run AIX (SP switch).

In 1994, the Maui High-Performance Computing Center at the University of New Mexico installed a powerful SP2 system that had 400 CPUs and could process 100 gigaflops of data.

Key Points:

  • IBM RS/6000 SP is a series of MPP computer systems that use POWER and PPC CPUs.
  • It ranges from two to 512 processors and was first introduced in 1993.
  • IBM’s POWERparallel architecture is used by IBM SP systems, which run AIX (SP switch).
  • The SP system is a high-performance computing system commonly used in research organizations.
  • An SP2 system installed in 1994 by the Maui High-Performance Computing Center had 400 CPUs and could process 100 gigaflops of data.

FAQ:

What is IBM RS/6000 SP?

IBM RS/6000 SP is a series of massively parallel (MPP) computer systems that are built on IBM’s RS/6000 models and use POWER and PPC CPUs.

What is the highest number of processors supported by the IBM RS/6000 SP system?

The IBM RS/6000 SP system ranges from two to 512 processors.

What architecture is used by IBM SP systems?

IBM’s POWERparallel architecture is used by IBM SP systems, which run AIX (SP switch).

Where is the IBM RS/6000 SP system commonly used?

The IBM RS/6000 SP system is a high-performance computing system commonly used in research organizations.

Final Thoughts:

IBM RS/6000 SP is a high-performance computing system that is commonly used in research organizations due to its processing power and scalability. Using POWER and PPC CPUs and IBM’s POWERparallel architecture, it can range from two to 512 processors, making it a reliable and efficient system for various computing needs.

- Advertisement -
Latest Definition's

ϟ Advertisement

More Definitions'