What isRSIP

RSIP, or Realm Specific IP, is a network address translation technique that is similar to NAT but ensures end-to-end transparency. It is a way for a user’s computer (RSIP client) to ask an RSIP server for a port number and public IP address when it wants to connect to a host on the internet.

Unlike NAT, which does IP address insertion at the router, RSIP does it at the client side. After the client has tunneled the packets to the RSIP server, the server removes the tunnel headers and broadcasts the packets to the internet. The RSIP server then adds the tunnel header and transfers the incoming packets to the RSIP client after looking up the client IP based on the port number.

FAQ

What is the difference between RSIP and NAT?

While both serve a similar purpose of network address translation, RSIP does IP address insertion at the client side and ensures end-to-end transparency, whereas NAT does so at the router.

Why would someone use RSIP?

RSIP may be used in situations where end-to-end transparency is important, such as online gaming or peer-to-peer file sharing.

Does RSIP have any drawbacks?

RSIP is not as widely adopted as NAT, and some routers and networks may not support it. Additionally, implementing RSIP may require additional hardware or software.

Conclusion

RSIP is a network address translation technique that allows for end-to-end transparency while ensuring IP address insertion at the client side. It may be useful in certain situations, but it is not as widely adopted as NAT and may require additional hardware or software.

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