What isSTREAMS

STREAMS is a feature in Unix System V that allows for the efficient generation and transmission of messages up and down the protocol stack. Essentially, it offers a common method for communication between application and network driver.

The network driver receives messages from the application downstream using STREAMS modules, and then these messages are sent upstream to the application. This can be useful for both transport layer protocols like TCP and SPX and network layer protocols like IP and IPX.

One of the key advantages of STREAMS is that it can support multiple protocols since modules can be dynamically altered at runtime. This means that the TLI and LSL interfaces, two important components of STREAMS, enable the transport and data link layers to communicate smoothly through similar languages.

FAQ

What does STREAMS stand for?

STREAMS stands for “STREam MAnagement System.”

Which Unix System V versions support STREAMS?

STREAMS originated in Unix System V, Release 3 and it’s widely used in all Unix System V-based operating systems like Solaris, HP-UX, and AIX.

What is the benefit of using STREAMS?

STREAMS provide a common method of communication between application and network drivers, which can enhance the efficiency of message generation and transmission up and down the protocol stack, leading to improved performance. Also, it can support multiple protocols since modules can be dynamically altered at runtime.

Conclusion

STREAMS in Unix System V is a feature that aims to ease communication between application and network driver by providing a common method for message generation and transmission. It can support multiple protocols and can be dynamically altered at runtime, which allows for improved efficiency and performance.

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