What isUNIX 93

X/Open, a specification from the Open Group, complied with multiple UNIX-based standards like XPG3, XPG4, SVID, and AT&T source code. However, in 1996, X/Open ended the UNIX 93 specification.

FAQ: X/Open UNIX Specification

Are you wondering what X/Open UNIX Specification is? Here are some frequently asked questions about it:

What is X/Open UNIX Specification?

The X/Open UNIX Specification is a set of standards that define a specific version of the Unix operating system and its associated libraries. It was developed and maintained by X/Open, which was an industry consortium of computer vendors.

What does the X/Open UNIX Specification include?

The X/Open UNIX Specification includes a set of interfaces, libraries, and programming languages that are specific to the Unix operating system. It defines a standard for the implementation of various functions and system calls, as well as the format of configuration files and command line options.

Why was the X/Open UNIX Specification important?

The X/Open UNIX Specification was an important development in the history of Unix because it ensured compatibility between different implementations of the operating system. It allowed software developers to write applications that would work on any system that complied with the specification, which made it easier for them to market their software to a wider audience.

What standards did the X/Open UNIX Specification comply with?

The X/Open UNIX Specification complied with a number of UNIX-based standards, such as XPG3, XPG4, SVID, and AT&T source code. These standards defined various aspects of the Unix operating system, such as the format of configuration files, the behavior of system calls, and the layout of file systems.

When was the X/Open UNIX Specification shut down?

In 1996, X/Open shut down UNIX 93, which was the last version of the X/Open UNIX Specification. It was replaced by the Single UNIX Specification, which was developed by a similar industry consortium called The Open Group.

The core:

The X/Open UNIX Specification played a significant role in the development of Unix as an operating system. It ensured compatibility between different implementations of the operating system and made it easier for software developers to write applications that would work on any Unix system. Although the X/Open UNIX Specification is no longer maintained, its legacy lives on in the Single UNIX Specification, which continues to define the standards for Unix-based operating systems today.

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