What isVESA local bus

VESA Local-BUS (VL-bus) was a peripheral bus commonly used in machines with 486 processors, providing a fast data path between CPU and peripherals. It was a 32-bit bus capable of operating at up to 40 MHz and supporting bus mastering. Each VL-bus slot on the motherboard supported up to three slots, divided into two parts: a Micro Channel slot and either an ISA, EISA, or another Micro Channel slot.

FAQs on VESA Local-BUS

What is VESA Local-BUS?

VESA Local-BUS (VL-bus) is a peripheral bus that was mostly used in machines with 486 processors. It provided a fast data path between the CPU and peripherals such as video and disk.

What were the technical specifications of VL-bus?

VL-bus was a 32-bit bus that could operate at up to 40 MHz. It also supported bus mastering, which allowed the peripherals to take control of the bus and perform data transfers independently of the CPU. Each VL-bus slot on the motherboard, which supported up to three slots, was divided into two parts: a Micro Channel slot and either an ISA, EISA, or another Micro Channel slot.

What advantages did VL-bus offer over other peripheral buses?

The VL-bus was faster than other peripheral buses of its time, such as ISA and EISA. It was also simpler to implement, as it did not require complex address decoding logic. Additionally, it supported bus mastering, which allowed for faster data transfer rates and improved system performance.

What Happened to VL-bus?

VL-bus was replaced by newer peripheral buses, such as PCI and AGP, in the mid-1990s. These buses offered even faster data transfer rates and improved system performance. Today, modern computers use the PCI Express (PCIe) bus for connecting peripherals to the CPU. However, VL-bus played an important role in the history of computer hardware and helped to pave the way for faster and more efficient peripheral buses.

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