What isVirtual Device Interface

VDI, a term coined by VMware for its Virtual Desktop Manager and VMware server, refers to desktop virtualization where virtual machines run on each desktop computer in a server. This technology provides a virtualized infrastructure for desktop computing. Additionally, there is a performance-enhancing Intel standard for full-motion video called the Interface for Video Devices.

What is VDI?

Virtual Desktop Infrastructure, commonly known as VDI, is a method of centralizing a desktop computing environment within a data center. With VDI, end-users can access their personalized desktops from any device, anywhere, at any time. The virtual desktops run on VMs on a server, while the device that the end-user is using acts as a client. VMware created the term VDI for its Virtual Desktop Manager (VDM) and VMware server, though the term has since become commonly used to refer to desktop virtualization in general.

Infrastructure for Virtual Desktops

VDI infrastructure typically consists of servers running a hypervisor, which creates and manages virtual machines. End-users access their virtual desktops through a connection broker, which manages the connection between the device and the virtual desktop. A storage area network (SAN) may also be used to store virtual desktops’ disk images, which can be accessed by end-users across the network.

The centralized nature of VDI infrastructure provides several benefits, including easier management and deployment of desktops, increased security, and reduced hardware and software costs.

Interface for Video Devices

Intel created a performance-enhancing standard called the Interface for Video Devices (IVD). This standard helps deliver full-motion video to virtual desktops by offloading video processing from the CPU to the graphics processing unit (GPU).

IVD improves the performance of virtual desktops, particularly for applications that require video playback, such as video conferencing and video editing. By leveraging the power of the GPU, VDI administrators can deliver a high-quality user experience while reducing strain on the CPU.

FAQ on VDI Infrastructure

What are the benefits of VDI infrastructure?

VDI infrastructure provides several benefits, including easier management and deployment of desktops, increased security, and reduced hardware and software costs. By centralizing desktops within a data center, administrators can manage and deploy desktops more efficiently, ensuring end-users have access to the latest software and applications. VDI infrastructure also provides increased security as data and applications remain on the server, reducing the risk of data loss if a device is lost or stolen. Finally, VDI can reduce hardware and software costs as end-users can access their desktops from any device, reducing the need for expensive hardware and software licenses.

What are the components of VDI infrastructure?

VDI infrastructure typically consists of servers running a hypervisor, which creates and manages virtual machines, a connection broker, which manages the connection between the device and the virtual desktop, and a storage area network (SAN), which stores virtual desktops’ disk images. The device that the end-user is using acts as a client to access their virtual desktop.

How does IVD improve virtual desktop performance?

IVD offloads video processing from the CPU to the GPU, improving virtual desktop performance, particularly for applications that require video playback, such as video conferencing and video editing. By leveraging the power of the GPU, VDI administrators can deliver a high-quality user experience while reducing strain on the CPU.

The supposition

VDI infrastructure provides a centralized, efficient way of managing and deploying desktops, reducing hardware and software costs, and increasing security. By leveraging the power of technology like IVD, administrators can improve end-user experiences and deliver rich-client experiences to the desktop.

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